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 Installation of Car Seats
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Steps for Addressing the Use of Inflatable Seat Belts With CRs - Wednesday, November 23, 2016

   Today, CPSTs are more likely than in the past to come across Ford Motor Company’s inflatable seat belts in situations where there is no alternative to their use. Would you know how to use one to install a CR, if necessary? 

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Nissan/Infiniti Recalls Affect Children - Wednesday, May 04, 2016

   At the end of April, over 3 million Nissan and Infiniti vehicles were recalled due to faulty air bag sensor software.  Some of the vehicles, 2013–2016 Nissan Sentras, had an additional recall related to damage that can occur when a CR is installed in the front passenger seat.  This damage can put the child in great danger because it can cause the air bag sensor to fail to detect the presence of a child, allowing the air bag to deploy in a crash.
   Learn more about the recalls…

 
It’s 2016! Are You Still Using Locking Clips? - Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Locking Clip   A common problem when installing a CR using a switchable retractor is that a locked shoulder belt, if too taut, can pull upward on the CR and tilt it to one side.  By using the right techniques, this problem can often be solved without resorting to a locking clip.    
Find Joe Colella’s YouTube video on this subject here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqubkH9aaaE

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Study Finds CR/Vehicle Mismatch Prevalent - Saturday, January 16, 2016

In October, a study was published that predicted that 42 percent of the time, vehicles and CRs are somehow incompatible.

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Where is the Least Risky Place for Childrfen to Ride? - Tuesday, September 02, 2008

Recent research results from real crashes shows that a child under age 4 has a 43-percent lower risk of injury riding in a car seat in the center of the back seat than in a side position.

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Adjusting Vehicle Head Restraints for Installing CRs: Some Dos and Don’ts - Tuesday, April 01, 2008

The problem of head restraints (HRs) interfering with CR installation seems to be growing because HR design improvements for non-CR passengers can actually be at odds with CR installation ease.

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 Using Car Seats for Infants
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First Ride—Not Always a Safe Ride - Saturday, January 10, 2015

   A new study of 267 newborn infants who were discharged from Oregon Health and Science University Hospital between November 2013 and May 2014 shows that almost all (93 percent) of the parents made significant errors in CR use or installation.

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Child Safety—Head Support Pads for Newborns - Friday, June 01, 2007

New babies do not have enough strength in their necks to hold their heads up to keep their airways open. Their heads tend to flop sideways or forward. Placing padding alongside the baby’s head can keep it from flopping sideways.

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 Using Car Seats for Babies and Toddlers
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New Requirements for RF-Only CRs, Other Hand-Held Carriers - Thursday, May 22, 2014

RF Only Carrier Warning LabelThe Consumer Product Safety Commission will impose new requirements for RF CRs with handles, including this new label.

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New Study Confirms: Rear-Facing is Best for Children up to Age 2 - Tuesday, April 01, 2008

There is new, unequivocal, real-world evidence that children under age 2 are best protected riding in a rear-facing (RF) CR. Injuries to rear- and forward-facing children under age 2 were studied in crashes from 1998 to 2003.

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Joel's Journey - Monday, September 01, 2008

On August 30, 2008, Joel and his mother were involved in a front car crash.  Joel, at 18 mos & 33lbs, was in his front facing car seat and still...broke his neck.  Go to JoelsJourney.Org for real life evidence of the benefits of staying rear-facing longer.

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 Using Car Seats and Boosters for Preschoolers
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Boosters Rated for Seat Belt Positioning - Wednesday, February 24, 2010

A recent report by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) rates the belt fit of many booster models.  A booster should route the lap belt flat across a child’s upper thighs, position the shoulder belt at mid-shoulder, and consistently fit this way in a variety of vehicles. The IIHS has revised its evaluation system since its prior report from 2008.

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Economics and CPS: A look at SuperFreakonomics - Monday, February 01, 2010

Economist Steven Levitt and author Stephen Dubner teamed up to analyze and challenge a variety of economic beliefs and practices, including a cost-to-value comparison of add-on CRs versus seat belts. Their 2005 book, Freakonomics, raised many questions, and the pair even wrote a paper on their analysis (though it was never published in a peer-reviewed journal). Their new sequel, SuperFreakonomics, expands on the earlier theme with additional assertions that further challenge the value of CRs for children over age two.

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Boosters Benefit Children Ages 4 Through 8 - Monday, February 01, 2010

A new analysis of Partners for CPS (PCPS) data reaffirms that boosters are an important step in providing protection to child passengers. The research input was more complete than previously published studies, and the results still prove that belt-positioning booster (BPB) use is more protective than seat belts alone. Children ages 4 to 8 using BPBs were 45 percent less likely to sustain injuries than those using just the vehicle seat belt.

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Unoccupied Boosters Can Injure Other Passengers - Saturday, March 01, 2008

Though the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) does not keep data on how often passengers are injured by loose items in vehicles, such as unsecured booster seats, these injuries do occur.  Two such incidents made headlines in Wisconsin in the past couple years.  While not fatally injured, both victims still suffer from lingering effects due to their injuries.

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 Using Booster Seats and Seat Belts for Pre-teens and Teens
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Call to Industry and Government: - Saturday, July 20, 2013

Bring Rear-Seat Safety to Its Full Potential
  The Center for Injury Research and Prevention recently released a thorough study of rear seat safety.  It concluded that, although it is always safer to ride in the rear, the relative benefits decrease for children who do not ride in CRs or boosters, and more so in recent years.  Find out why in this report.

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Drinking Drivers Who Crash Kill Kids in Their Cars - Thursday, January 01, 2004

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that one in every four deaths in crashes of children under age 15 is related to alcohol use.

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